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Service Design

service design spot image

From Insight to Implementation

By Andy Polaine, Ben Reason & Lavrans Løvlie

Published: March 2013
Paperback: 216 pages
Paperback ISBN: 978-1933820-33-0
Ebook ISBN: 978-1933820-61-3

Service Design is an eminently practical guide to designing services that work for people. It offers powerful insights, methods, and case studies to help you design, implement, and measure multichannel service experiences with greater impact for customers, businesses, and society.

Service Design is an eminently practical guide to designing services that work for people. It offers powerful insights, methods, and case studies to help you design, implement, and measure multichannel service experiences with greater impact for customers, businesses, and society.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Insurance Is a Service, Not a Product
Chapter 2: The Nature of Service Design
Chapter 3: Understanding People and Relationships
Chapter 4: Turning Research into Insight and Action
Chapter 5: Describing the Service Ecology
Chapter 6: Developing the Service Proposition
Chapter 7: Prototyping Service Experiences
Chapter 8: Measuring Services
Chapter 9: The Challenges Facing Service Design

FAQ

These common questions about service design and their short answers are taken from the book Service Design: From Insight to Implementation. You can find longer answers to each in your copy of the book, either printed or digital version.

  1. Is service design just customer experience, user experience, or interaction design?
    No. They are close cousins to service design, but they are not the same, although work in both customer experience and user experience forms part of service design’s remit. We often use the term “user” instead of “customer” in the book, sometimes interchangeably, but sometimes because there are contexts in which a service user might not be a customer or because a service user might also be a service provider (such as a teacher or a nurse). Some projects lend themselves to different language—customers, partners, clients, patients—depending on the project context. Interaction and user experience design are often understood as design for screen-based interactions, but service design covers a broader range of channels than this. Some projects have a strong digital component, of course, so interaction and user experience design have an important part to play, but so do product design, marketing, graphic design, and business and change management.

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