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Engaged

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Designing for Behavior Change

By Amy Bucher

Published: March 2020
Paperback: 320 pages
Paperback ISBN: 978-1933820-42-2
Ebook ISBN: 978-1933820-41-5

Behavior change design creates entrancing—and effective—products and experiences. Whether you’ve studied psychology or are new to the field, you can incorporate behavior change principles into your designs to help people achieve meaningful goals, learn and grow, and connect with one another. Engaged offers practical tips for design professionals to apply the psychology of engagement to their work.

If these describe you, you may be the audience for this book:

  • You love attending conferences like UXPA, CHI, the Habit Summit, or HxRefactored
  • Your commute finds you listening to podcasts like Freakonomics Radio, 99% Invisible, HumanTech, or Radiolab
  • You have a job title like product manager, designer, or experience strategist (or you do the type of work associated with those titles)
  • You’ve worked in design agencies, on in-house strategy or design teams at big companies, or for yourself with clients
  • Your shower time is spent thinking about how to make the world a better place by making new products and experiences or fixing the ones already there
  • You’re always wondering why people do what they do and how to design for them

Behavior change design creates entrancing—and effective—products and experiences. Whether you’ve studied psychology or are new to the field, you can incorporate behavior change principles into your designs to help people achieve meaningful goals, learn and grow, and connect with one another. Engaged offers practical tips for design professionals to apply the psychology of engagement to their work.

If these describe you, you may be the audience for this book:

  • You love attending conferences like UXPA, CHI, the Habit Summit, or HxRefactored
  • Your commute finds you listening to podcasts like Freakonomics Radio, 99% Invisible, HumanTech, or Radiolab
  • You have a job title like product manager, designer, or experience strategist (or you do the type of work associated with those titles)
  • You’ve worked in design agencies, on in-house strategy or design teams at big companies, or for yourself with clients
  • Your shower time is spent thinking about how to make the world a better place by making new products and experiences or fixing the ones already there
  • You’re always wondering why people do what they do and how to design for them

Testimonials

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 – A Kind of Magic: Psychology and Design Belong Together
Chapter 2 – Pictures of Success: Measurement and Monitoring
Chapter 3 – It’s My Life: Making Meaningful Choices
Chapter 4 – Weapons of Choice: Make Decisions Easier
Chapter 5 – Something in the Way: Diagnosing Ability Blockers
Chapter 6 – Fix You: Solving Ability Blockers
Chapter 7 – Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger: Designing for Growth
Chapter 8 – Come Together: Design for Connection
Chapter 9 – Mr. Roboto: Connecting with Technology
Chapter 10 – A Matter of Trust: Design Users Can Believe In
Chapter 11 – Someday Never Comes: Design for the Future Self
Chapter 12 – Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now: Go Forth and Engage

FAQ

These common questions and their short answers are taken from Amy Bucher’s book Engaged: Designing for Behavior Change. You can find longer answers to each in your copy of the book, either printed or digital version.

  1. I’ve got a background in behavior science, but no talent for visual design. Can I do behavior change design?
    Absolutely. I was a total amateur at all of the things I thought were design before I started working in the field (and am still not very good at many of them). My strengths are research, strategy, and evaluation, so I partner with people who bring the visual and interaction design and application development chops. I have colleagues who have stronger design skills and less research experience, so they team up accordingly. It’s all about building a team that can complement each other. Chapter 12 offers tips for bringing behavior change into your work, regardless of your background.

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